Company Sergeant Major Alfred Cook GM

01 Nov 1983

  • George Medal
  • Italy Star medal
  • France and Germany Star medal
  • Efficiency Medal (Territorial) to 1969 medal

Alf Cook came from Goole in Yorkshire, and joined the Territorial Army (King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) in 1934. Shortly before the outbreak of war he joined the Regular Army  and transferred to the Royal Artillery, serving with them until 1941, when he joined the Army Physical Training Corps.

A couple of years later he volunteered for airborne forces and qualified as a military parachutist, as part of a cadre of ten Sgt Instructors from the APTC, on course 42, which ran at RAF Ringway in December 1943.

The following year he was attached to 1st Light Battery RA (Airborne), later to become 1st Airlanding Anti-Tank Battery RA, and deployed to North Africa. While working as an assistant parachute jump instructor on a flight in August 1943, one of his trainees (Pte Trevor) jumped and had a hang up, resulting in Pte Trevor being suspended in the aircraft’s slipstream.

Trevor later recounted that while in this position he had abandoned all hope, spreadeagled by the terrific force of the wind currents. Bearing in mind that in those days British paratroopers did not wear reserves and, had the static line failed,Trevor could have fallen to his death.Equally, it was highly unlikely he would survive any attempt to land the plane with him still attached and initial attempts to haul him back into the aircraft failed against the overwhelming force of the slipstream.

In an outstanding and hair raising act of bravery, Sgt Instructor Cook shimmied down the static line to the unfortunate trainee while the aircraft was flying at about 800 feet. Sgt Cook attempted to free Trevor from his perilous situation while gripping him with his feet. However, the buffeting and twisting in the slipsteam resulted in his own parachute starting to entwine round that of Trevor. Realising his predicament Cook made one final effort to free Trevor as he released himself. Cook was fortunate not to have a partial canopy collapse on the way down as five of the rigging lines on his parachute had been severed in the mid air melee with Pte Trevor.

Although Cook’s efforts to free Trevor were ultimately unsuccessful, this exceptional act of bravery resulted in Cook being awarded the George Medal later that year. Fortunately, the unlucky paratrooper was later hauled back into the aircraft.

Cook attended a refresher course in May 1944 at RAF Ringway and took part in the Battle of Arnhem later that year, attached as a Staff Sergeant Instructor to Headquarters Troop of the 1st Airlanding Anti Tank Battery, where he was taken prisoner.

Following repatriation from the PoW camp in 1945, Alf Cook served for two months at the Army School of Physical Training and then completed the remainder of his service as Company Sergeant Major (Instructor) at the Army Air Corps Depot until his demobilisation to the Army Reserve in March 1946.

Alf Cook met his future wife, Dolly, in 1940 while working at Rotherham Drill Hall and they married after the war in 1948.

In 1953 he was awarded a Royal Humane Society Testimonial for rescuing a Dutch seaman from drowning.

Alf Cook died suddenly of a heart attack on 1 November 1983.

Read More

Service History

Alfred  Cook

Photos_1

  • Sgt Instructor Alf Cook GM of the Army Physical Training Corps talking to a paratrooper c1943

    Sgt Instructor Alf Cook GM of the Army Physical Training Corps talking to a paratrooper c1943

    1 Image Buy Prints

Medal Citations_1

  • George Medal Citation for Sgt Instructor Alfred Cook 4689266

    George Medal Citation for Sgt Instructor Alfred Cook 4689266

    1 Item

Official documents_1

Letters and Cards_2

  • Letter of commendation to Sgt Instructor Cook, from Brigadier General Ray Dunn, 1943

    Letter of commendation to Sgt Instructor Cook, from Brigadier General Ray Dunn, 1943

    1 Item
  • Letter of commendation to Mr A Cook, from the National Dock Labour Board, 1953

    Letter of commendation to Mr A Cook, from the National Dock Labour Board, 1953

    1 Item

Latest Comments

There are currently no comments for this content.

Add your comment